Review: Turtles All The Way Down by John Green

It’s been five years but here we are. John Green has a new book on the shelves again. We have this little gem in our hands. It’s something we all want to be a part of. More than a want, a need. (I’m sorry. That was too good an opportunity to miss. Let me know when you get the reference)

Turtles All The Way Down cover John Green.jpg

Title: Turtles All The Way Down

Author: John Green

Pages: 286

Amazon, Waterstones, Foyles

Turtles All the Way Down is the story of sixteen-year-old Aza Holmes, a young woman looking for clues in the disappearance of a fugitive billionaire, while grappling with mental illness.

Turtles All the Way Down begins with a fugitive billionaire and a cash reward. It is about lifelong friendship, the intimacy of an unexpected reunion, Star Wars fan fiction, and tuatara. But at its heart is Aza Holmes, a young woman navigating daily existence within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts. In his long-awaited return, John Green tells Aza’s story with shattering, unflinching clarity.

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Review: An American in Paris

Last night I went to the Dominion Theatre in London to see the new musical An American in Paris. The musical is an adaptation of the 1951 Oscar-winning film of the same name starring the likes of Gene Kelly. It features a 50-something strong cast of dancers, actors and musicians and is accompanied by a score belonging to George and Ira Gershwin. A musical is always in safe hands with a Gershwin. It was nice to escape for a few hours and be transported back to the Golden Age of musical theatre.

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Rebel of the Sands by Alwyn Hamilton: Review

So last week’s tube read was *drumroll*

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Title: Rebel of the Sands

Author: Alwyn Hamilton

Pages: 358

Amazon, Waterstones, Foyles

“Tell me that and we’ll go. Right now. Save ourselves and leave this place to burn. Tell me that’s how you want your story to go and we’ll write it straight across the sand.” Dustwalk is Amani’s home. The desert sand is in her bones. But she wants to escape. More than a want. A need. Then a foreigner with no name turns up to save her life, and with him the chance to run. But to where? The desert plains are full of danger. Sand and blood are swirling, and the Sultan’s enemies are on the rise.

Here’s another book I bought and read off the back of an event I attended at Waterstones Piccadilly. Alwyn was a really engaging panel chair and I loved the snippets I heard about her books so I thought I’d give this one a go.

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Film Review: Goodbye Christopher Robin

For me, Winnie the Pooh started everything. 

I learnt to read with Winnie the Pooh books, the first videos (yes videos – I hope some of you are old enough to remember beautiful clunky VHS tapes) I remember watching were Winnie the Pooh. My bedroom, and my nursery for that matter, were stuffed with Winnie the Pooh soft animals. I’m not even going to pretend that I got rid of any of those because they occupy a permanent space in my heart (and my loft).

Long story short, I adore Winnie the Pooh and the occupants of the Hundred Acre Wood. A lot. Always have, always will. So you can imagine my heart flipped on hearing that we were getting a creation film based on the author of my childhood. I was so damn happy. It was going to be like Saving Mr Banks all over again.

My eyes leaked for the entire 107 minutes.

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Juggling and the value of a part time job

Anyone who knows me well will know that I am an incredibly busy person. Maybe even dangerously so. My gran says I’m not afraid of hard work. Everyone else calls me a workaholic. I’m not sure what label I’d put on myself. I only know that my brain is simply not cut out for university, and only the work I do there, to be my sole purpose of getting up in the morning. I need something else to occupy part of my days. Education can’t be my everything. I’d go insane if it was.

Because of this drive (can I call it that…?) I have always had at least one part time job alongside my studies. At the age of fourteen I began my first weekend job and by the time I reached my Alevels when I was seventeen/eighteen I still had that job and had acquired a second part time job whilst working full time almost every evening at my local theatre. Every second I wasn’t in a class room was packed with work to gain experience and earn some money to plan for the future.

You’re probably thinking I’m insane, right? But honestly I feel like a much better and more rounded person for it. If you need, or want, to get a job alongside uni then this might help you decide what’s best for you. You don’t have to go as mad as I did, and thankfully now I just have the one (almost) full time job, but maybe you might benefit from mulling this over.

Here are my tips for mastering the art of juggling.

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